John Thwaites

Last updated on 2017-08-15T22:05+0300.

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Quotes... Extracted quotes from

John Thwaites said : “It will affect our crop entirely this year. We rely on them for the bulk of our labour. We hire local people as well but the main bulk of the labour is from Jamaica and without them here now to do the work that is required early in the spring, our crop will be in jeopardy,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “These men that come in from Jamaica are highly trained. They know their work. We have had some people offer to help and it’s much appreciated but typically people come with the wrong set of skills,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “The tree suffers because it will try to grow too much… it certainly will put the health of the tree in jeopardy for the coming years,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites says : "The Wilsons Promontory fire focused attention on the dangers of hazard reduction burns, given the changes in weather and more hot and windy days in autumn," External link

abc-au Thursday, January 9, 2020 9:25:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites says : "While the bill as it is currently written requires medical practitioners to ‘do their best’ to ensure that the person expresses their wish free from pressure from any other person, there is no way legislation can ensure this will always be so," "We urge MPs to carefully consider this amendment. Nobody wants to see elderly and vulnerable people coerced to end their lives against their true will. Drs Say NO hopes Chris Penk’s proposed amendment will highlight just how unsafe any euthanasia legislation is" External link

voxy Tuesday, August 20, 2019 5:33:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “Severe weather events are causing flooding, particularly in informal settlements in the Pacific, that leads to diseases including diarrhoea, that can be very serious and fatal in people, particularly children,” External link

pina Friday, August 2, 2019 6:22:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : "Severe weather events are causing flooding, particularly in informal settlements in the Pacific, that leads to diseases including diarrhea, that can be very serious and fatal in people, particularly children," External link

ecowatch Thursday, August 1, 2019 8:24:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : “When we understand that climate change is a health issue, and that health is already being affected here in Australia and across the region, it is clear that there is an urgent need for action,” External link

tenplay Tuesday, July 30, 2019 11:34:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : “We live in a region of developing countries,” “Their success in achieving sustainable development is our success; our future depends on them” External link

eco-business Tuesday, December 13, 2016 7:27:00 AM EAT



Key Titles and Phrases Count Lang Last Seen
premier22.22%EN08/23/201723/08/2017
deputy16.67%EN08/23/201723/08/2017
minister16.67%EN07/02/201702/07/2017
professor33.33%EN12/13/201613/12/2016
deputy premier11.11%EN07/27/200727/07/2007
Names Lang Count
John ThwaitesEN100.00%


 
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Thursday, January 27, 2022

8:19:00 AM EAT

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Matthew Elliott said ( about John Thwaites ) : “To be honest with you it was nice to spend Christmas at home with the family for once!” "But we had support from the government which got us through. As for next year, I hope the extra numbers that came to Tenby in 2021, maybe for the first time because they weren’t going abroad, liked what they saw and will come back”. One spot where most if not all holidaymakers pop their heads into during the summer months is the iconic Tenby Rock, Fudge and Sweets shop, located on the corner of Church Street. No other shop evokes quite the same feelings. In many ways this shop is Tenby. On a cold wintry afternoon, there are a few customers inside. People love rock, it seems, even while wearing a scarf. “We’ll close up shop in December and then open again in mid February,” said John Thwaites, who has run the shop since it opened in 1987. “We’re busy throughout the summer period but we do put the hours in. Most days we’re open about 12 hours and work about 14 hours. We used to open for six months and close for six months, but that all changed in about 2000, when we noticed more and more people coming to Tenby even at this time of year. More people have holiday homes here these days, and things like the autumn internationals help too. “We’ve also noticed this year that a lot of people have been coming here from all over who have never been here before. I think a lot of tourist spots in England were so busy in the summer that people came down here instead. “We will know by March what kind of summer we’ll have next year. A lot of the caravan sites will have had their bookings by then and they will be the first to know if it’s going to be a really busy summer. There might still be some restrictions in place and different paperwork to sort out if you want to go on a foreign holiday so I think a lot of people, especially if they have a big family, would rather come here”. A quick walk around The Esplanade and its adjoining streets offers further reassurance that Tenby can and is coping in winter. Most windows have ‘no vacancies’ signs in the windows. While some may be operating at a reduced capacity at this time of year, it at least proves that people still want to stay in Tenby even at a time when they can’t frolic on the sand. One man who has taken a pragmatic approach to the quiet season is Jeremy Cargill. Originally from Newcastle, he has run Southcliff Guest House, a short distance from South Beach, for the past five years. He isn’t even open at this time of year because, as he puts it, it’s just not worth it, and it allows him the opportunity to recharge his batteries for the crazy season. “What we found is, people were booking up to stay here in October a long time in advance but then dropping out as the year went on, for whatever reason,” explained Jeremy. “So what we had then was a situation where we would stay open just for one person. The last thing you want as a guest house is to have one guest. So we decided to close and re-open either in February or March. It normally starts with the weekends and then builds and builds to being full all the time over the summer, and that income covers us for the winter months. “You can only make good money in Tenby over the summer. This year is a bit different because of what’s happened with Covid but normally there’s a clear divide between summer and winter. As soon as Ironman is finished it’s pretty much done. “The summer of 2020 was really hard. We had just had a new roof and spent every penny we had, so we really needed that Easter trade but they shut us down. We had £10,000 in a grant from the Welsh Government and that really was the saving grace, then finally we were allowed to open for a couple of months at the back end of the summer and that kept us going. “This year was different. We didn’t open until May 17 but the summer as a whole was the busiest I have ever seen Tenby. I remember speaking to people in the bar here and they would typically say ‘I would normally be in Greece now’. Thankfully they were here instead”. Jeremy doesn’t mind the fact that Tenby changes in the autumn. While the balance sheet would be healthier if the town was thriving all year round, it is vital for his business to strike a happy medium. “We need to have that break because in the summer it’s literally seven days a week, all the time, and we need to have some time off," External link

southwales-eveningpost Sunday, December 5, 2021 1:25:00 PM EAT

Matthew Elliott said ( about John Thwaites ) : “To be honest with you it was nice to spend Christmas at home with the family for once!” "But we had support from the government which got us through. As for next year, I hope the extra numbers that came to Tenby in 2021, maybe for the first time because they weren’t going abroad, liked what they saw and will come back”. One spot where most if not all holidaymakers pop their heads into during the summer months is the iconic Tenby Rock, Fudge and Sweets shop, located on the corner of Church Street. No other shop evokes quite the same feelings. In many ways this shop is Tenby. On a cold wintry afternoon, there are a few customers inside. People love rock, it seems, even while wearing a scarf. “We’ll close up shop in December and then open again in mid February,” said John Thwaites, who has run the shop since it opened in 1987. “We’re busy throughout the summer period but we do put the hours in. Most days we’re open about 12 hours and work about 14 hours. We used to open for six months and close for six months, but that all changed in about 2000, when we noticed more and more people coming to Tenby even at this time of year. More people have holiday homes here these days, and things like the autumn internationals help too. “We’ve also noticed this year that a lot of people have been coming here from all over who have never been here before. I think a lot of tourist spots in England were so busy in the summer that people came down here instead. “We will know by March what kind of summer we’ll have next year. A lot of the caravan sites will have had their bookings by then and they will be the first to know if it’s going to be a really busy summer. There might still be some restrictions in place and different paperwork to sort out if you want to go on a foreign holiday so I think a lot of people, especially if they have a big family, would rather come here”. A quick walk around The Esplanade and its adjoining streets offers further reassurance that Tenby can and is coping in winter. Most windows have ‘no vacancies’ signs in the windows. While some may be operating at a reduced capacity at this time of year, it at least proves that people still want to stay in Tenby even at a time when they can’t frolic on the sand. One man who has taken a pragmatic approach to the quiet season is Jeremy Cargill. Originally from Newcastle, he has run Southcliff Guest House, a short distance from South Beach, for the past five years. He isn’t even open at this time of year because, as he puts it, it’s just not worth it, and it allows him the opportunity to recharge his batteries for the crazy season. “What we found is, people were booking up to stay here in October a long time in advance but then dropping out as the year went on, for whatever reason,” explained Jeremy. “So what we had then was a situation where we would stay open just for one person. The last thing you want as a guest house is to have one guest. So we decided to close and re-open either in February or March. It normally starts with the weekends and then builds and builds to being full all the time over the summer, and that income covers us for the winter months. “You can only make good money in Tenby over the summer. This year is a bit different because of what’s happened with Covid but normally there’s a clear divide between summer and winter. As soon as Ironman is finished it’s pretty much done. “The summer of 2020 was really hard. We had just had a new roof and spent every penny we had, so we really needed that Easter trade but they shut us down. We had £10,000 in a grant from the Welsh Government and that really was the saving grace, then finally we were allowed to open for a couple of months at the back end of the summer and that kept us going. “This year was different. We didn’t open until May 17 but the summer as a whole was the busiest I have ever seen Tenby. I remember speaking to people in the bar here and they would typically say ‘I would normally be in Greece now’. Thankfully they were here instead”. Jeremy doesn’t mind the fact that Tenby changes in the autumn. While the balance sheet would be healthier if the town was thriving all year round, it is vital for his business to strike a happy medium. “We need to have that break because in the summer it’s literally seven days a week, all the time, and we need to have some time off," External link

icWales Sunday, December 5, 2021 7:16:00 AM EAT

AfricaBrief

John Thwaites

Last updated on 2017-08-15T22:05+0300.

About this image

sign

Quotes... Extracted quotes from

John Thwaites said : “It will affect our crop entirely this year. We rely on them for the bulk of our labour. We hire local people as well but the main bulk of the labour is from Jamaica and without them here now to do the work that is required early in the spring, our crop will be in jeopardy,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “These men that come in from Jamaica are highly trained. They know their work. We have had some people offer to help and it’s much appreciated but typically people come with the wrong set of skills,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “The tree suffers because it will try to grow too much… it certainly will put the health of the tree in jeopardy for the coming years,” External link

barrie Friday, March 20, 2020 12:06:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites says : "The Wilsons Promontory fire focused attention on the dangers of hazard reduction burns, given the changes in weather and more hot and windy days in autumn," External link

abc-au Thursday, January 9, 2020 9:25:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites says : "While the bill as it is currently written requires medical practitioners to ‘do their best’ to ensure that the person expresses their wish free from pressure from any other person, there is no way legislation can ensure this will always be so," "We urge MPs to carefully consider this amendment. Nobody wants to see elderly and vulnerable people coerced to end their lives against their true will. Drs Say NO hopes Chris Penk’s proposed amendment will highlight just how unsafe any euthanasia legislation is" External link

voxy Tuesday, August 20, 2019 5:33:00 AM EAT

John Thwaites said : “Severe weather events are causing flooding, particularly in informal settlements in the Pacific, that leads to diseases including diarrhoea, that can be very serious and fatal in people, particularly children,” External link

pina Friday, August 2, 2019 6:22:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : "Severe weather events are causing flooding, particularly in informal settlements in the Pacific, that leads to diseases including diarrhea, that can be very serious and fatal in people, particularly children," External link

ecowatch Thursday, August 1, 2019 8:24:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : “When we understand that climate change is a health issue, and that health is already being affected here in Australia and across the region, it is clear that there is an urgent need for action,” External link

tenplay Tuesday, July 30, 2019 11:34:00 PM EAT

John Thwaites said : “We live in a region of developing countries,” “Their success in achieving sustainable development is our success; our future depends on them” External link

eco-business Tuesday, December 13, 2016 7:27:00 AM EAT



Key Titles and Phrases Count Lang Last Seen
premier22.22%EN08/23/201723/08/2017
deputy16.67%EN08/23/201723/08/2017
minister16.67%EN07/02/201702/07/2017
professor33.33%EN12/13/201613/12/2016
deputy premier11.11%EN07/27/200727/07/2007
Names Lang Count
John ThwaitesEN100.00%


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Thursday, January 27, 2022

8:19:00 AM EAT


Quotes... Explore Relations


EMM Visual Explorer


Quotes... Extracted quotes about

Matthew Elliott said ( about John Thwaites ) : “To be honest with you it was nice to spend Christmas at home with the family for once!” "But we had support from the government which got us through. As for next year, I hope the extra numbers that came to Tenby in 2021, maybe for the first time because they weren’t going abroad, liked what they saw and will come back”. One spot where most if not all holidaymakers pop their heads into during the summer months is the iconic Tenby Rock, Fudge and Sweets shop, located on the corner of Church Street. No other shop evokes quite the same feelings. In many ways this shop is Tenby. On a cold wintry afternoon, there are a few customers inside. People love rock, it seems, even while wearing a scarf. “We’ll close up shop in December and then open again in mid February,” said John Thwaites, who has run the shop since it opened in 1987. “We’re busy throughout the summer period but we do put the hours in. Most days we’re open about 12 hours and work about 14 hours. We used to open for six months and close for six months, but that all changed in about 2000, when we noticed more and more people coming to Tenby even at this time of year. More people have holiday homes here these days, and things like the autumn internationals help too. “We’ve also noticed this year that a lot of people have been coming here from all over who have never been here before. I think a lot of tourist spots in England were so busy in the summer that people came down here instead. “We will know by March what kind of summer we’ll have next year. A lot of the caravan sites will have had their bookings by then and they will be the first to know if it’s going to be a really busy summer. There might still be some restrictions in place and different paperwork to sort out if you want to go on a foreign holiday so I think a lot of people, especially if they have a big family, would rather come here”. A quick walk around The Esplanade and its adjoining streets offers further reassurance that Tenby can and is coping in winter. Most windows have ‘no vacancies’ signs in the windows. While some may be operating at a reduced capacity at this time of year, it at least proves that people still want to stay in Tenby even at a time when they can’t frolic on the sand. One man who has taken a pragmatic approach to the quiet season is Jeremy Cargill. Originally from Newcastle, he has run Southcliff Guest House, a short distance from South Beach, for the past five years. He isn’t even open at this time of year because, as he puts it, it’s just not worth it, and it allows him the opportunity to recharge his batteries for the crazy season. “What we found is, people were booking up to stay here in October a long time in advance but then dropping out as the year went on, for whatever reason,” explained Jeremy. “So what we had then was a situation where we would stay open just for one person. The last thing you want as a guest house is to have one guest. So we decided to close and re-open either in February or March. It normally starts with the weekends and then builds and builds to being full all the time over the summer, and that income covers us for the winter months. “You can only make good money in Tenby over the summer. This year is a bit different because of what’s happened with Covid but normally there’s a clear divide between summer and winter. As soon as Ironman is finished it’s pretty much done. “The summer of 2020 was really hard. We had just had a new roof and spent every penny we had, so we really needed that Easter trade but they shut us down. We had £10,000 in a grant from the Welsh Government and that really was the saving grace, then finally we were allowed to open for a couple of months at the back end of the summer and that kept us going. “This year was different. We didn’t open until May 17 but the summer as a whole was the busiest I have ever seen Tenby. I remember speaking to people in the bar here and they would typically say ‘I would normally be in Greece now’. Thankfully they were here instead”. Jeremy doesn’t mind the fact that Tenby changes in the autumn. While the balance sheet would be healthier if the town was thriving all year round, it is vital for his business to strike a happy medium. “We need to have that break because in the summer it’s literally seven days a week, all the time, and we need to have some time off," External link

southwales-eveningpost Sunday, December 5, 2021 1:25:00 PM EAT

Matthew Elliott said ( about John Thwaites ) : “To be honest with you it was nice to spend Christmas at home with the family for once!” "But we had support from the government which got us through. As for next year, I hope the extra numbers that came to Tenby in 2021, maybe for the first time because they weren’t going abroad, liked what they saw and will come back”. One spot where most if not all holidaymakers pop their heads into during the summer months is the iconic Tenby Rock, Fudge and Sweets shop, located on the corner of Church Street. No other shop evokes quite the same feelings. In many ways this shop is Tenby. On a cold wintry afternoon, there are a few customers inside. People love rock, it seems, even while wearing a scarf. “We’ll close up shop in December and then open again in mid February,” said John Thwaites, who has run the shop since it opened in 1987. “We’re busy throughout the summer period but we do put the hours in. Most days we’re open about 12 hours and work about 14 hours. We used to open for six months and close for six months, but that all changed in about 2000, when we noticed more and more people coming to Tenby even at this time of year. More people have holiday homes here these days, and things like the autumn internationals help too. “We’ve also noticed this year that a lot of people have been coming here from all over who have never been here before. I think a lot of tourist spots in England were so busy in the summer that people came down here instead. “We will know by March what kind of summer we’ll have next year. A lot of the caravan sites will have had their bookings by then and they will be the first to know if it’s going to be a really busy summer. There might still be some restrictions in place and different paperwork to sort out if you want to go on a foreign holiday so I think a lot of people, especially if they have a big family, would rather come here”. A quick walk around The Esplanade and its adjoining streets offers further reassurance that Tenby can and is coping in winter. Most windows have ‘no vacancies’ signs in the windows. While some may be operating at a reduced capacity at this time of year, it at least proves that people still want to stay in Tenby even at a time when they can’t frolic on the sand. One man who has taken a pragmatic approach to the quiet season is Jeremy Cargill. Originally from Newcastle, he has run Southcliff Guest House, a short distance from South Beach, for the past five years. He isn’t even open at this time of year because, as he puts it, it’s just not worth it, and it allows him the opportunity to recharge his batteries for the crazy season. “What we found is, people were booking up to stay here in October a long time in advance but then dropping out as the year went on, for whatever reason,” explained Jeremy. “So what we had then was a situation where we would stay open just for one person. The last thing you want as a guest house is to have one guest. So we decided to close and re-open either in February or March. It normally starts with the weekends and then builds and builds to being full all the time over the summer, and that income covers us for the winter months. “You can only make good money in Tenby over the summer. This year is a bit different because of what’s happened with Covid but normally there’s a clear divide between summer and winter. As soon as Ironman is finished it’s pretty much done. “The summer of 2020 was really hard. We had just had a new roof and spent every penny we had, so we really needed that Easter trade but they shut us down. We had £10,000 in a grant from the Welsh Government and that really was the saving grace, then finally we were allowed to open for a couple of months at the back end of the summer and that kept us going. “This year was different. We didn’t open until May 17 but the summer as a whole was the busiest I have ever seen Tenby. I remember speaking to people in the bar here and they would typically say ‘I would normally be in Greece now’. Thankfully they were here instead”. Jeremy doesn’t mind the fact that Tenby changes in the autumn. While the balance sheet would be healthier if the town was thriving all year round, it is vital for his business to strike a happy medium. “We need to have that break because in the summer it’s literally seven days a week, all the time, and we need to have some time off," External link

icWales Sunday, December 5, 2021 7:16:00 AM EAT