Kadir Nelson

Last updated on 2010-11-06T07:30+0300.

About this image

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Quotes... Extracted quotes from

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

tribtown Wednesday, October 14, 2020 2:24:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

therepublic Wednesday, October 14, 2020 2:07:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

dailyjournal Wednesday, October 14, 2020 1:29:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

seattlepi Tuesday, October 13, 2020 11:48:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

citynews-ca Tuesday, October 13, 2020 9:20:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

news4jax Tuesday, October 13, 2020 8:13:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

clickondetroit Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:51:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

beaumontenterprise Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:25:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

seattlepi Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:16:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

680news Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:01:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

startribune Tuesday, October 13, 2020 6:52:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : “I’m thrilled and honored to have been asked to create the key art for ‘black-ish’ on ABC,” External link

thegrio Tuesday, September 29, 2020 9:26:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "But I totally understand. It takes a back seat to all of what we're experiencing. That's just where we are at the moment," External link

CBSnews Sunday, April 19, 2020 5:39:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "I think one of the things that we're probably missing, a lot of people are missing now, is human touch, because we have to stay so far away from one another," "So, I wanted to make sure to emphasize that that is part of being a human being, is human touch" External link

CBSnews Sunday, April 19, 2020 5:39:00 PM EAT



Key Titles and Phrases Count Lang Last Seen
Names Lang Count
Kadir NelsonEN47.06%
Kadir NelsonFR41.18%
Кадир НельсонRU11.76%


 
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Kadir Nelson

Last updated on 2010-11-06T07:30+0300.

About this image

sign

Quotes... Extracted quotes from

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

tribtown Wednesday, October 14, 2020 2:24:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

therepublic Wednesday, October 14, 2020 2:07:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

dailyjournal Wednesday, October 14, 2020 1:29:00 AM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

seattlepi Tuesday, October 13, 2020 11:48:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

citynews-ca Tuesday, October 13, 2020 9:20:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

news4jax Tuesday, October 13, 2020 8:13:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

clickondetroit Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:51:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

beaumontenterprise Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:25:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "There are very important or visceral images that grab our attention and provoke thought and may inspire us to take action or do something that brings forth the best part of ourselves, hopefully”. With his painting for “black-ish,” Nelson sees himself following the path of the late artist Ernie Barnes, whom he described as a mentor. “The Sugar Shack,” Barnes' joyous painting of a music club, was used in the 1970s sitcom “Good Times” and as cover art for Marvin Gaye's 1976 album “I Want You”. Nelson's art has appeared on album covers including Drake's “Nothing Was the Same”. Nelson's painting will be the basis for “black-ish” print, digital and other promotion in its seventh season, based on a high-resolution image of the work that he has retained. The artist anticipates that the original will end up with a collector. In 2017, he created another work for “black-ish,” this one used in the “Please, Baby, Please” episode that was a lament on social and environmental ills and took sharp jabs at at President Donald Trump. Shelved by ABC, it saw the light of day when Disney corporate sibling Hulu released it earlier this year. ABC said Nelson was “the first artist on the list” for the family portrait, citing his contribution to “Please, Baby, Please” and his recent works for The New Yorker and Rolling Stone. The latter used Nelson's “American Uprising,” depicting a woman and child at the forefront of a protest march, to illustrate a Black Lives Matter cover story. In developing the concept for the “black-ish” painting, the network and the show's producers gave him “pretty much free reign,” Nelson said, and a sketch sold them on the idea of the Johnsons coping together despite the pandemic quarantine. Like “The Cosby Show” before it, Nelson said, “black-ish” depicts a successful family with humor and warmth, headed by professionals (dad is an advertising executive, mom a medical doctor) who are attentive parents. While the Johnsons face issues common to all Americans, providing a Black family's perspective allows the series to hit “very key points that we all need to think about,” he said. ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

seattlepi Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:16:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : ”And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action,” External link

680news Tuesday, October 13, 2020 7:01:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "And we have to talk about them to provoke conversations, to inspire conversations and and inspire action," External link

startribune Tuesday, October 13, 2020 6:52:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : “I’m thrilled and honored to have been asked to create the key art for ‘black-ish’ on ABC,” External link

thegrio Tuesday, September 29, 2020 9:26:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "But I totally understand. It takes a back seat to all of what we're experiencing. That's just where we are at the moment," External link

CBSnews Sunday, April 19, 2020 5:39:00 PM EAT

Kadir Nelson said : "I think one of the things that we're probably missing, a lot of people are missing now, is human touch, because we have to stay so far away from one another," "So, I wanted to make sure to emphasize that that is part of being a human being, is human touch" External link

CBSnews Sunday, April 19, 2020 5:39:00 PM EAT



Key Titles and Phrases Count Lang Last Seen
Names Lang Count
Kadir NelsonEN47.06%
Kadir NelsonFR41.18%
Кадир НельсонRU11.76%


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<<10<12345678910>>>10

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Friday, December 4, 2020

4:43:00 PM EAT


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